Thursday, May 21, 2020

Like 4G before it, 5G is being hyped

Update 5/21/2020: AT&T Inc. says it will stop using the phrases "5G Evolution" and "5G Evolution, The First Step to 5G" in marketing its 4G LTE network that provides 5G speeds, according to CNN. The National Advertising Review Board recommended the change, saying the language "will mislead reasonable customers" into thinking they're buying a 5G servivce. AT&T said in a statement that it "respectfully disagrees" with the recommendation but said it would comply. 

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Thanks to Kevin DiLallo, Laura McDonald and Joe Schmidt (see source)

Thursday, May 14, 2020

BrandPost: Expert Insights: The Hidden Value of Collaboration Behind Huawei Innovation

"Open collaboration worldwide is a must." That’s the view of Huawei founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei. As he puts it, it's impossible for one company to dominate the information market, and even more difficult for one company to provide everything one individual or enterprise needs.

Emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, cloud, and intelligent computing are affecting both our commercial and everyday lives. Service providers experiencing huge changes in customer demands are ramping up their digital transformation, which is impacting short- and long-term business models. However, because most industries are increasingly specialized, it's common that no single ICT company can solve all of the problems for every enterprise. Tech firms must engage in strategic partnerships to ensure successful and sustainable digital transformation. This drive for innovation is essential both for their own growth as well as that of their clients.

To read this article in full, please click here


Thanks to Brand Post (see source)

Gartner: IT spending will drop 8% as COVID-19 hits enterprise wallets

Gartner this week said that IT spending across the globe is projected to total $3.4 trillion in 2020, a decline of 8% from 2019 due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In January Gartner had forecast Worldwide IT spending to total $3.9 trillion in 2020, an increase of 3.4% from 2019.

Gartner’s new forecast says all market segments from enterprise software to communications service will experience a decline in 2020, with devices and data-center systems experiencing the largest drops in spending. 

To read this article in full, please click here


Thanks to Michael Cooney (see source)

BT in talks to sell multibillion-pound stake in Openreach

Macquarie among investors looking at deal that would bankroll £12bn UK broadband upgrade
Thanks to (see source)

Intelsat files for bankruptcy amid burden of legacy debt

Satellite operator to clear customers from its airwaves ahead of US government auction of its spectrum
Thanks to (see source)

Feedback from Another SD-WAN Fan

I don’t know what’s wrong with me, but I rarely get emails along the lines of “I deployed SD-WAN and it was the best thing we did in the last decade” (trust me, I would publish those if they’d come from a semi-trusted source).

What I usually get are sad experiences from people being exposed to vendor brainwashing or deployments that failed to meet expectations (but according to Systems Engineering Director working for an aggressive SD-WAN vendor that’s just because they didn’t do their research, and thus did everything wrong).

Here’s another story coming from Adrian Giacometti.


Thanks to (see source)

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

What is IoT? The internet of things explained

The internet of things (IoT) is a catch-all term for the growing number of electronics that aren't traditional computing devices, but are connected to the internet to send data, receive instructions or both.

There's an incredibly broad range of things that fall under that umbrella: Internet-connected "smart" versions of traditional appliances like refrigerators and light bulbs; gadgets that could only exist in an internet-enabled world like Alexa-style digital assistants; internet-enabled sensors that are transforming factories, healthcare, transportation, distribution centers and farms.

What is the internet of things?

The IoT brings the power of the internet, data processing and analytics to the real world of physical objects. For consumers, this means interacting with the global information network without the intermediary of a keyboard and screen; many of their everyday objects and appliances can take instructions from that network with minimal human intervention.

To read this article in full, please click here


Thanks to Jon Gold (see source)

What is IoT? The internet of things explained

The internet of things (IoT) is a catch-all term for the growing number of electronics that aren't traditional computing devices, but are connected to the internet to send data, receive instructions or both.

There's an incredibly broad range of things that fall under that umbrella: Internet-connected "smart" versions of traditional appliances like refrigerators and light bulbs; gadgets that could only exist in an internet-enabled world like Alexa-style digital assistants; internet-enabled sensors that are transforming factories, healthcare, transportation, distribution centers and farms.

What is the internet of things?

The IoT brings the power of the internet, data processing and analytics to the real world of physical objects. For consumers, this means interacting with the global information network without the intermediary of a keyboard and screen; many of their everyday objects and appliances can take instructions from that network with minimal human intervention.

To read this article in full, please click here


Thanks to Jon Gold (see source)

How IoT will rescue aviation

A biotech company that develops sensors to detect explosives and other chemicals on planes and in airports is teaming up with Airbus to create a sensor that could detect passengers who are positive for COVID-19.

California-based Koniku and Airbus, which have been working since 2017 on contactless equipment that sniffs out chemicals, are trying to adapt that technology to sniff out pathogens, says Osh Agabi, founder and CEO of Koniku, in a blog post.

To read this article in full, please click here


Thanks to Patrick Nelson (see source)

How to examine processes running on Linux

There are quite a number of ways to look at running processes on Linux systems – to see what’s running, the resources that processes are using, how the system is affected by the load and how memory is being used. Each command gives you a different view, and the range of details is considerable. In this post, we’ll run through a series of commands that can help you view process details in a number of different ways.

ps

While the ps command is the most obvious command for examining processes, the arguments that you use when running ps will make a big difference in how much information will be provided. With no arguments, ps will only show processes associated with your current login session. Add a -u and you'll see extended details.

To read this article in full, please click here


Thanks to Sandra Henry-Stocker (see source)

Ethernet Alliance study finds Power over Ethernet issues

Four out five users experience challenges with power over Ethernet (PoE) deployments, according to a new survey of nearly 800 Ethernet designers, manufacturers, resellers, system integrators, network operators and others.

Conducted by the Ethernet Alliance in January, the study  found a number of key PoE insights, including:

  • Four out of five users experienced issues, including support, reliability, or connection challenges.
  • The top three PoE installations are cameras and phones, as well as computing and storage devices;
  • Of customers planning to implement PoE 63% said they would need 30w; 47% would need between 30-60w and 27% need greater than 60w.

With the global market projected to grow to $2 billion by 2025, PoE remains a wellspring of lucrative opportunities for designers, systems integrators, and solutions providers, David Tremblay, chair of the alliance's PoE Subcommittee, and system architect for Aruba, said in a statement. “Despite this good news, there are significant challenges that could threaten PoE’s growing adoption.”

To read this article in full, please click here


Thanks to Michael Cooney (see source)

Do We Need Bare Metal Servers in Public and Private Clouds?

Whenever I was comparing VMware NSX and Cisco ACI a few years ago (in late 2010s in case you’re reading this in a far-away future), someone would inevitably ask “and how would you connect a bare metal server to a VMware NSX environment?

While NSX-T has that capability since release 2.5 (more about that in a later blog post), let’s start with the big question: why would you need to?


Thanks to (see source)

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

How synthetic full backup works and why you might need it

The invention of synthetic full backups is one of the most important advancements in backup technology in the last few decades, right up there witih disk-based backups, deduplication, continuous data protection (CDP), and the cloud.

Here’s how they came to be and an explanation of what benefits they might offer.

Traditional backup options

There are essentially two very broad categories of what the backup industry calls backup levels;

you are either backing up everything (full backup) or you are backing up only what has changed (incremental backup). There are different types of incremental backups, but that's really not relevant to this particular discussion. A typical set up runs incremental backups every night and full backups every week – or even less often than that.

To read this article in full, please click here


Thanks to W. Curtis Preston (see source)